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Moog Hydra-point three-axis, numerically-controlled miller was manufactured in England during the 1960s by Moog Hydra-point Ltd. on a machine made by the Bridgeport subsidiary, Adcock & Shipley Ltd.The machine was designed for straight-line milling, drilling, reaming, boring and tapping and was controlled by a numerical control unit, with pneumatic tape reading, that took standard 1-inch wide 8-track paper tape. Both the cutting tool and the workpiece were positioned hydraulically.

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A 1917 view of one of the shell workshops at the Cunard Shell Works in Bootle, with a female worker in the foreground using a heavy lathe to begin shaping the interior cavity of a large shell casing. In 1915 the Cunard Steamship Company’s store and engineering works at Rimrose Road, Bootle, was converted to operation as a munitions factory. The predominantly female workforce manufactured various sizes of shells

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Denbigh drills were of an absolutely conventional design, their origins going back to Victorian times and little developed even after WW2 – though a few more modern bench and pillar drills with enclosed V-belt drive, the K and S Series, had been introduced during the 1950s. Denbigh had their own foundry – unsurprising, as they were in the very heart of the original English iron founding area – and turned out castings to a very high standard. All their machine tools were heavily built, capable of absorbing continuous industrial use and were widely exported

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Workers watching the 4000 ton press slabbing an armour plate ingot at Cammell Laird’s Cyclop’s Ordnance Steel Tyre and Spring Works in Grimesthorpe. The factory also produced shells during the war. Charles Cammell and Company’s Grimesthorpe Works were built in 1865. The firm merged with Laird, Son & Company in 1903 to form Cammell Laird and Company who commissioned this photograph. 1913

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