Machinist Image Gallery

This page contains images related to machinery and machinist work. Each image as a short description describing the type of metalworking equipment. This page does take a little while to load, and is continuously being updated weekly.
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Froriep horizontal boring mill. Australian army defense at Bendigo ordnance factory, 1970

Based in Rheydt, Germany, Froriep were best known for their specialized machine tools that included vertical lathes, coping lathes, boring mills and wheel disc and boring machines
Manufactured by Herman Beichle of Heidenheim-Schnaitheim, in Germany, the massively-built Combined Universal Die Milling Machine. The practical result of this arrangement was that, at one setting a job could be machined on several sides in a number of angular positions – and even radial surfaces that transformed into planes could be completed in one operation (i.e. both circular and straight milling was possible in one continuous operation) the makers claiming that the transition from one to another would be invisible on the finished article
Interior of the barrel shop at the Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) factory in Smallheath. Workers are finishing gun barrels. The BSA factory was founded in 1861. This photograph, taken for Waring & Gillow Ltd, shows rifle barrels or possibly barrels for Lewis guns, a light machine gun used both on the battlefield and on aircraft. 1916
The Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) factory was located in Armoury Road, Small Heath. This images shows women working in Machine Shop One. The factory produced rifles, Lewis guns, shells and vehicles. The BSA factory was founded in 1861. 1915
Cincinnati milling machines, 1942 Cincinnati Milling Machine Company.
From the 1940s Delta book, Getting the Most Out of Your Abrasive Tools. Different methods to sharpen jointer knives. This image shows using a jig on a table saw and another one with a drill press acting as a tool grinder. These books have a lot of different methods you don’t see published anymore.I’ll share more from this series
Foundry aboard the USS Edsall, 1943. 
I’ve never actually seen one of these in a ship before
Machine shop aboard the USS Edsall, 1943. Anyone recognize the lathe?
Here’s another illustration from the Better Grinding book by Landis Tool Company. The book is full of these. Who remembers white lead?
At Falk Corporation. The machine and recorder are manufactured by Illinois Toolworks of Chicago. The machine is capable of checking the accuracy of involute profiles on pinions or gears up to 36 inch outside diameter. Pinion description: 20 teeth, 1 1/2 DP, 24 inch face, 5 degree helix angle, single helical, full depth mill type teeth, right hand helix.
Girth Gear and Rider Ring for Sugar Mill made by Falk Corporation in Wisconsin. This was purchased by Colorado Fuel and Iron and used by Union Sugar Division of Consolidated Foods Corporation. Original Falk caption reads, “This is the first diffuser gear of this size to be cut at Falk. The process used to cut this gear was also new. It consisted of single position indexing and form milling cutters to produce the involute profile on the teeth.
1940s Ch. Schäublin-Villeneuve SV 120 High Precision Turret Lathe.
Early 1940s Ch. Schäublin-Villeneuve simple Toolmakers’ Lathe model SV102.
Schaublin Bevilard Assembly-shop in the early 1970s. Schaublin 53 rotary tables in foreground with 102 turret tailstock behind. Note Oerlikon UB2 drill background right.
Springfield Armory’s experimental shop (in Bldg. 28) 1923, in Massachusetts. it was in this shop that John Garand and his team developed and created his innovative weapons from the 1920’s until Garand retired in the early 1950’s. Garand is in the background to the right in his dark suit examining a drawing while another man holds what appears to be a Garand M1921 rifle.
Machine shop at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 1930s. Not sure exactly what the machinist is turning, but he has a few of them there. Maybe someone from the water and power industry will recognize these.
Ward No. 7 Prelector Combination Turret Lathe. Spindle hole is 2.625″ with a 16″ swing over the bed with stainless steel covers. Made in Birmingham, England
Machine shop at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 1920s. Looks like they had electricity at the shop in 1920. The lathe on the right appears to have one of those fancy overhead electric motor drives so you can put the lathe anywhere you want in the shop.
The Wheel Shop at the Vulcan Foundry. Here we can see axles being turned on a relatively small Craven centre lathe ready for  assembly. Cast wheels and their steel tyres lying stacked all around the man working the lathe.Craven Brothers was a British engineering firm started in 1853 by brothers William and John Craven that built large machine tools for railway and engineering workshops and later workshop and railway cranes.
Ward Capstan Lathes. These look like nice capstan lathes.
Model “NH” Plano Surface Grinder by The Churchill Machine Tool Co. of Manchester, England.  The NH uses a periphery wheel mounted on a horizontal spindle. A vertical spindle attachment carrying a ring or segmental wheel is optional. These were made with table widths up to 60 inches and bed lengths up to 14 feet.
Nice size Cincinnati Planer Co. Ohio at East Broad Top Railroad & Coal Company, Machine Shop, Rockhill Furnace, PA.

Operating from 1871 to 1956, it is one of the nation’s oldest and best-preserved narrow-gauge railroads, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964. The railroad, now preserved for use as a tourist attraction
During the First World War the shortage of men meant that many more women began working in traditionally male environments. Here women are being employed in a factory making shells for the war. The shells will be shipped elsewhere to be filled with explosives before they are ready for use. 1917
Hope your week is starting better than this. This CNC crash comes from @jcengineeringltd. “We are not really sure. The spindle came down with the tool changer under the spindle. Possibly a fault with a relay.” Thanks for sharing! Now I don’t feel so bad about the drill bit I bent today. ☺️ Keep your week grungy
This picture was sent in by @flatblackdub of the Volkswagen plant in Germany in 1952. They are operating Bullard Mult-au-matic drilling machines with multiple spindles
1920s Cincinnati AMES MFG. CO. turret lathe setup for production work at  Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Nebraska
Machinist using a Kearns No. 5 Horizontal Borer to bore out steam cylinders in the 1950’s at Vulcan Foundry in Lancashire.
Workman at Shildon wagon works operating slotting machine. 16 Sept 1952.
Students work in the machine shop laboratory of the mechanic arts program in the Tulane University College of Technology New Orleans, LA, circa 1905. 
The young chap on the left looks like he is looking at his cellphone. Typical
The machine shop at the London, Midland & Scottish Railway’s Wolverton Carriage & Wagon Works, 11 March 1930. Wolverton works dates from 1838 and is the oldest surviving railway workshop in the UK. In the 1930s the works built carriages, wagons and road vehicles.

Look at those long belts
In 1915 the Cunard Steamship Company’s store and engineering works at Rimrose Road, Bootle, England was converted to operation as a munitions factory. The predominantly female workforce manufactured various sizes of shells. 1917 picture showing women standing on duck boards working on lathes. 
I like the little cranes or lifts that they have attached to the end of each lathe bed
In 1976, Koren published the world’s first scientific paper on the algorithmic design of interpolators for CNC machines. These interpolators coordinate the motions of machine axes so that non-linear shapes can be cut on machines, thereby facilitating the production of high-precision complex parts.

Yoram Koren controls the CNC-AC milling machine that he designed (McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, May 1973)
The control computer of both the CNC and the AC was Hewlett-Packard HP-2100. It was a 16-bit computer with a memory of 4096 words (4K), with cycle time of 1 microsecond and 16 I/O slots that were used to send signals to the three control loops and obtained signals from a  force sensor mounted on the spindle
The machine shop. Mechanic Arts High School in Boston, ca 1895. There’s a lot of old nice equipment in there.
London Kingston Power Station workshops – big metal lathe machining a crankshaft ca 1920s.
Swiss made Simonet DZ-450, a 4″ x 18″ (102 mm x 450 mm) backgeared, screwcutting lathe. Based closely on the design of the Schaublin 102 (all accessories are interchangeable, though the spindle on the Simonet, is different at  M38 x 2.5 mm) it was fitted with a “single-lever” operated oil-bath backgear assembly equipped with hardened gears. Taking W20 collets, the hardened, ground and lapped headstock spindle ran in plain bronze bearings
Naomi Parker Fraley, the inspiration for the iconic female World War II factory worker Rosie the Riveter, has died. She was 96.The Tulsa, Oklahoma, native, who was born on August 26, 1921, died on Saturday in Longview, Washington, according to the New York Times. The California waitress-turned-factory worker began her job at the Naval Air Station in Alameda and was among the first women to be assigned to the machine shop after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in late 1941.Then in 1942, 20-year-old Fraley posed for a photograph wearing her signature red-and-white-polka-dot bandana and working on a Pratt & Whitney 12″ vertical shaper, for a photographer touring the Naval Air Station
Gerhard Jeckering working as a tool maker at the Ohio Machine Tool Company in Kenton, Ohio 1920 Here operating a 20″ Ohio metal shaper.
Machine shop at Emerson Electric in St Louis, MO, 1920s.Got to love those big windows in those older factories
Machinist at the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, PA operating a big Niles Bement Pond Co. metal planer in 1937.Poster of this image is available at Machinistlife.com.
Machinist working on a Deckel FP2 mill using a centering microscope at Shelton Precision Engineers, Melbourne 1970s
Machinist at the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, PA setting up a Niles Bement Pond Co. metal planer in 1937. Poster of this image is available at Machinistlife.com
In 1986 Cunliffe and Croom, based at their Broughton Works in Edward Street, Manchester, had become a Limited Company and were amongst the first sixteen firms to contribute share capital to the new Machine Tool and Engineering Federation, Ltd.  a grouping that was to become the (British) Machine Tool Trades Association.This is a late-model Cuncliffe & Croom vertical milling machine.
Automatics at the  Gurnos Works of the Anglo-Celtic Watch Co. in South Whales. Some automatics are said to appear to be producing nothing, because they are making the tiny pins used to hairspring pinning and similar processes. The pins are so minute that they fall with the turning swarf into a small container and are sorted out afterwards.
Raymatic model R 50 automatic lathe 1954 Australia. Looks like a Hardinge in the back right. 
I’ve never seen one of these in the states. Don’t know if any are still in use
Hendey heavy-duty 4C Manufacturing lathe swung 16 7/16″ over the bed, 9 inches over the cross slide and could be ordered with a between-centres capacity of between 30 and 90 inches at intervals of 12 inches.
Here’s another CNC crash from @nymanolof. Someone thought the endmill ran better without coolant. “Back from parental leave and greeted by this welded stuck piece of highspeed mill! “same procedure as last year”, but a bit more expensive!!” Ouch
Anyone ever work on one of these large vertical machining centers? This one is a PowerTurn by Waldrich Coburg in the UK
Fellows 70-15 gear shaper. Anyone using one of these?
Elevated view of two employees running the internal printing press of Gisholt Machine Company. The “Gisholt Crib” was an internal newsletter. Apparently a lot of effort went into their newsletter. Does your company have a newsletter?
Camp Forrest, located in Tullahoma, Tennessee, was one of the U.S. Army’s largest training bases during World War II. It was an active army post between 1941 and 1946.

This is one of their mobile machine shops
Archdale 20″ Horizontal Milling Machine. Judging by the footwear, this operator must have been brought down from Accounts to strike a suitable pose.
Gisholt Turret lathe promotional photograph.
548th Ordnance Heavy Maintenance Company machine shop at Hunter Liggett Military Reservation on 24 March 1944
Promotional photo for a Gisholt No. 12 Automatic Precision Lathe
72″ Niles lathe cutting a turbine shaft.
Gisholt was well known for their heavy duty turret lathes, but they also made a wide range of industrial balancers. This is a Dyanetric Type U Balancing Machine made by Gisholt
Pouring the castings for a Gisholt turret lathe bed at Gisholt Machine Company.
Gisholt Santa made out of machined parts. ☺️ Merry Christmas everyone! 🎄
Here’s an 86″ Bullard vertical boring mill with massive 120″ heavy duty rams
View of a battery of turret lathes in the “Gisholt Department” in a factory of the Peerless Auto Motor Car Company taken while machinery is in operation. The lathes flank each other that are attached to rotary belts, suspended from the ceiling.
Doing some beautiful work on a Barber Coleman gear hobbing machine.
The casting of a 36″ King vertical turret lathe sitting on top of a 120″ King VTL.
Man working on a turret lathe inside the Gisholt Machine Company. That’s quite the turret assembly
Standard Turret Lathe, “Conradson,” by American Turret Lathe Company in Wilmington, Delaware, “Patented December 26, 1899.” Look at that turret set up.
Old beautiful Bullard VTL 1956
View of 21″ and 24″ lathes on the Willys-Overland Motor Company factory floor. These lathes machined rear axle parts, which are piled at each work station. The lathes are arranged end-to-end, and are attached to rotary belts which are suspended from the ceiling. Natural light is flooding the room from the factory windows.
Gisholt Machine Co. factory. Nice Lodge & Shipley lathe and several pieces of Gisholt machinery lined up on the factory floor.
This is how I get my morning and week going! How do you start yours?. . 🍵
Gisholt didn’t just make great turret lathes. They were also known for their balancing machines. This is a Gisholt Dynetric balancing machine, with foot pedal. Anyone have one of these in their shop?
Gisholt worker supervising a power hacksaw in the factory. Does anybody recognize the make of the saw?
Gisholt 22″ Turret Lathe. The metal stamp states: “American Turret Lathe Mfg. Co. Patented December 26, 1899. Semi-Automatic. Warren, PA.” The Pennsylvania plant was the other Gisholt works factory outside of Madison, Wisconsin. Gisholt was the first company to specialize in heavy type turret lathes adapted to finishing of medium and heavy castings and forgings.
Bullard was definitely the “Cadillac” of VTLs. Here’s one of their pentagonal turrets with precision dovetail tooling on a Dynatrol.
DeVlieg JMC JIGMIL horizontal boring machine JMC-340. Has a 40″ x 40″ x 30″ work envelope with a 15 hp motor. 20-3,000 RPMs Net weight 27,400 lbs. With a tape feed computer.
DeVlieg JIGMIL model 3-B taken in 1946. Look at that set up.
DeVlieg 43K-72 JIGMIL horizontal boring mill. Has a 48″ x 72″ x 96″ table, and an optional 20 HP motor
DeVlieg 3J-40 had a 3″ spindle and a 40″ x 40″ x 30″ work envelope. Load capacity 5000 lbs. Diatrol IV-T three-axis tape input system was optional.
Employee of the Gisholt Company of Madison demonstrating a plastic laminate drill jig manufactured by the Consoweld Company of Wisconsin Rapids.
Display of a 50-ton machine, developed by the Gisholt Machine Company, that will help speed up production of automobile crankshafts. W.A. Smlja, on the left, is master mechanic for the Plymouth division of the Chrysler Corp. and Charles H Foster, Gisholt sales manager is on the right. The machine, first of its kind to be invented, can out six crankshaft pins in a single operation. 1947
Pouring castings for a Gisholt turret lathe at the factory
Gisholt Machine Company known for their turret lathes and their band. Does your company have a band?
View of new turret lathe (center) manufactured by American Tool Works. It is standing on a factory floor flanked by other similar machines that are attached to rotary belts, suspended from the ceiling. Electrical light bulbs are strung above each work station. The factory room is lit by both natural light from the windows and electricity. The original envelope housing this photograph was inscribed with the following information: “They [the lathes] have a stop for cross carriage, same as Gisholt which you cannot see in view.”
Automatic saddle lathe in the factory shop. Promotional material for the Gisholt Machine Company states that “for duplication of machined castings and forgings in large quantities, the Gisholt Automatic Turret Lathe is even more rapid than the hand operated machine, and its assembly of multiple cutting tools do their work more quickly and surely.” Generally one operator ran three or more machines, “reducing the cost for labor to a fraction of that required for hand operated machines.”
Factory floor at the Gisholt plant, located in the 1200 and 1300 blocks of East Washington Avenue. I see some Kearney Treckers and Cincinnati mills down there.
Gisholt 52″ vertical boring mill. The machine has a turret head on the left hand side and “an attachment for crowning pulleys or fly wheels, capable of finishing various convexities without the use of cams, for any size pulley with diameter not exceeding 12′. The fly wheel shown is 43 1/2″ in diameter and 8 1/4″ face. It is finished on the Gisholt Mill in 91 minutes . . . . In finishing hoisting engine drums on this mill the time required is 90 minutes . . . . The operator is not a skilled operator.” Gisholt was the first company to specialize in heavy type turret lathes adapted to finishing of medium and heavy castings and forgings
Gisholt 22″ Turret Lathe. The metal stamp states: “American Turret Lathe Mfg. Co. Patented December 26, 1899. Semi-Automatic. Warren, PA.” The Pennsylvania plant was the other Gisholt works factory outside of Madison, Wisconsin. Gisholt was the first company to specialize in heavy type turret lathes adapted to finishing of medium and heavy castings and forgings.
28″ Old Type Gisholt turret lathe at the Packard Motor Car Company factory. This lathe machined a brake band support. The photo was inscribed with “Showing centering device on top of turret for truing up large end of piece by putting it on boring bar and holding piece in position while chucking.”
This automatic turret lathe, photographed inside the factory shop was manufactured in 20″ and 30″ sizes. Produced by 1920, promotional material for the Gisholt Machine Company states that “for duplication of machined castings and forgings in large quantities, the Gisholt Automatic Turret Lathe is even more rapid than the hand operated machine, and its assembly of multiple cutting tools do their work more quickly and surely.” Generally one operator ran three or more machines, “reducing the cost for labor to a fraction of that required for hand operated machines.”
Gisholt Machine Co. workers posing outdoors near the side of the brick factory building with a large sign that reads: “Safety Pays at Gisholt.” The billboard promotes safety with cash rewards. Do any of your shops have a reward system for safety?
Gisholt Standard Turret Lathe. Gisholt Machine Co. in Madison, WI was the first company to specialize in heavy type turret lathes adapted to finishing of medium and heavy castings and forgings.
Sept. 26, 1916. “Boys of Wanganui Technical College, New Zealand, during an engineering class.” Got to love those uniforms and ties
Heivil lathes were marketed at one time in the UK under the brand name “Etsco”. During the 1930s, and possibly during the next decade as well, Percy Martin of Leicester offered both a plain-turning precision bench lathe for toolroom use and a much larger screwcutting version, the up-to-date 10-inch “High Precision Heavy Duty Tool Room Lathe” – a lathe was was available in between centres’ capacities of 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 inches. A choice was offered of either a cone-pulley drive by flat belt (Model CPD) or as one of two types of all-geared head
Ward Capstan Lathes – Model 7 Prelector Turret Lathe. The No.7 Prelector capstan lathe offered all of the features of the smaller machines, but with additional features aimed at reducing operator fatigue, such as fully powered saddles and air chuck on the machine shown in this image. This size of machine was rarely used with a bar feed, although one was available with conventional auto chuck or collets
Any Fray attachment or mill owners out there?All Fray millers were designed by an Englishman (born in Hale, Lancashire), James H. Richards, a man who became president and CEO of the Company. Mr. Richards also held patents for an inside/outside micrometer, a pneumatic grease gun and a form of worm-drive steering gear. He was the grandchild of steam engine inventor Richard Trevithick.
Factory floor of The National Acme Company in Cleveland, OH. They are assembling Acme-Gridley Automatics or Bar Machines.
Elaborate setup with a Cincinnati horizontal mill and dividing head with a Bridgeport mill head and tracers. I bet this took a while to set up. How long do you think it took?
This lathe and mill were sent in by @bullseyeenterprises “Here’s the machining end of our operation Wilson MK.V 15″ x70″ lathe and a Wecheco FU-2 mill. I’ve had a difficult time finding info on this mill is you have anything I’d really appreciate it. All I can find is it’s made in Argentina” Unfortunately I couldn’t find anymore on Wecheco. They made a bunch of different mills and lathes. If anyone knows more Please comment below and Tag @bullseyeenterprises. Thanks for sharing
Krause Universal Machine UM2 combining a screwcutting centre lathe with a horizontal milling machine and drill press. Manufactured by Krause & Co. of Wein, Austria,  the UM2 and UM3 Universal machine tools were once a very popular installation in ships, larger submarines and mobile workshops fitted in the back of trucks and railway wagons. Labelled “Krauseco
Hendey Lathe and Shaper Factory image. The underside of a saddle being scraped to mate perfectly with the bed ways. Attention to detail! Guy is probably thinking it’s to dark in here
Tree 2UV Vertical Milling Machine from Tree Tool & Die Works of Racine, WI
This machinist poster shows Monarch 10EE metal lathes and other equipment in an instrument machine shop taken in 1953. Can you identify all the different machines?
Look at what I came across in my library! ☺️ Would you guys like to see some pictures of these with descriptions?
Here’s another machinist poster of a machine shop in 1946 with a large series of Hendey Machine Co. geared head metal lathes and some Monarch 10EE toolroom lathes.
Famco Model 200 2 hp Vertical, Ram Type, Turret Milling Machine. A very heavy-duty column was surmounted by a 15-inch diameter swivelling turret which held a ram running on dovetail slides; the body of the ram held both the 2 hp, 3-phase reversing motor and the complete, oil-bath lubricated, speed-change gearbox whose shafts all ran on taper or ball bearings
1945 machine shop with a series of Hendey Geared Head Lathes with machinist. Personally, I like the patriotism hanging from the ceiling with all the USA made machines.
Aluminum Ingot Production, Alcoa, Point Henry, VIctoria 1964. What would you machine out of that?
Swedish made AB ARBOGA MASKINER ER 830 & ER 1830 Radial Drills.
1945 machine shop features a Niles radial drill, a Bullard vertical turret lathe, and a Kearney Trecker Milwaukee horizontal milling machine.
Vertical honing machine by Nagel GmbH of Nürtingen accurate to 0.001mm. The stroke of the machine was controlled hydraulically with compressed air moving the grinding stones of the honing tool onto the wall of the hole. The amount of material removed was measured by a pneumatic device and, once to size, cut off the air supply so ending the operation
A series of Tree Milling Machines in a machine shop from 1970.
Tree 2UVR Milling Machine from Tree Tool & Die Works of Racine, WI
Tree 2UV Vertical Milling Machine from Tree Tool & Die Works of Racine, WI
Tree 2VG Vertical Milling Machine from Tree Tool & Die Works of Racine, WI
TREE 2UVRC Vertical Milling Machine from Tree Tool & Die Works of Racine, WI
Machining shows rotor rocket motor and impeller being machined on a Cincinnati milling machine with a Bridgeport head and tracers
Instrument shop at NASA Glenn Research Center. Can you identify all the different machines? There’s a small vertical Hardinge mill in the back left.
Cincinnati machines to produce jet engine components being assembled in Plant 1 in 1952. In the foreground are “sweep” millers for machining impellers. Behind them, and to the right, are machines that automatically milled the airfoil profile of engine blades, six at a time.
1960 Litton Glass Lathe sent in by @brucesuba These were named after Charles Litton who was an engineer and inventor. He pioneered the manufacturing process for transmitting and vacuum tubes during WWII. Thanks for sharing
Photo of Cincinnati 14″x 72″ L Plain Hydraulic Grinding Machine—Model OE. Built 1962 sent in by @riskyj. Thanks for sharing this long grinder
Wilmarth and Mormon surface grinder from circa 1920 sent in by @hintzecustomknives. He’s looking for information he can find on these. Please message him or comment below, if know of anything. Thanks
The new Dial Type milling machine by Cincinnati Mills was a hit at 1929 tool show. Its dual controls – front and rear – and fast,  powered changes of feed rates and spindle speeds made the machinist’s job easier. 1929 was Cincinnati Mills 45th Anniversary, and it was the same year it became the the US’s largest machine tool builder
In 1963 Cincinnati Mills subsidiary, Cincinnati Lathe and Tool Co. introduced the Cintimatic equipped with the new solid state Acramatic Hundred Series NC positioning control. The Cintimatic was a best seller all over the world. Did any of you ever operate one of these?
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers. Check out the link in my profile for great grungy machinist gear
Fageol Motors machine shop. 1920s Oakland, California.
IBM Workshops, Endicott, New York, in the early 1930s Ten Hardinge cataract underdrive bench lathes being used by well-dressed gentlemen. At least they rolled up their sleeves
Fageol Motors machine shop. 1920s Oakland, California. Look at all the different machines and belts in there
In 1968, North American Rockwell used this 275 ft long NC profiler to machine fuel panels for the Saturn V rocket which took astronauts to the moon. I always find it amazing where machinist have taken us
Fancy lady and her South Bed mill. She should at least have eye protection on. 😎
1962 Lang J6 coming to the end of a rebuild from Matthew Davenhill. That’s looking pretty good. I’ve never seen one of these in person. Thanks for sharing
One of my favorite photos of the William Doxford & Sons shipyard with the large radial drill 1957-58
Fageol Motors machine shop. 1920s Oakland, California
Deep-hole boring machine manufactured by the German VDF group. This particular one was used in INDEX-Werke automatic lathe factory around 1964
Heald Grinders, division of Cincinnati Mills, Worcester plant in 1920s. Internal grinder assembly. Even during the depression these sold very well, because auto shops found them useful for regrinding automobile cylinders
This is a picture sent in by @riskyj of the Cincinnati Milacron Vertical Mill No. 420-16 made in England. Nice looking! Thanks for sharing
Here’s a pic of the Cincinnati Horizontal Mill No. 2P. In the background of the other pic from @riskyj. Thanks for sharing. These machines are amazing.   for Cincinnati Mills shirts
These are really cool! Safety glasses from the 1920s. These were sent in by David O’Neill. See those guys in the old pictures had no excuse
This CNC crash comes from @clgoncalves78. “Got a tool crash for you on a vf3. The tool holder welded to the shaft in the 4th axis.” Nice video. I’ll show some pictures closer later. Thanks for sharing!
Cincinnati Milacron 7 axis machine designed to lay tape on contoured surfaces of molds 1983. It laid pre-impregnated continuous fiber tape onto the contoured bodies of the mold using ultrasonic and other sensors. This was the first machine to do this task, which used to be done by hand. This was necessary for aerodynamically shaped parts
The crowds of people watching the Cincinnati Mills demonstration at 1984 IMTS in Chicago. A robotics arm takes workpieces to and from three CNC Machines. One turning center and two machining centers. That would have been impressive to see. Was anyone there?
This nice looking Warner & Swasey Turret Lathe was sent in by @ne0n_s1ck Looks like a nice Cincinnati shaper in the background.
Thanks for sharing
The KU299 universal boring machine. This table is 22 meters (72ft) in diameter and can hold up to 560 tons. Made in USSR by Kolomna Heavy Machine Tool in 1970 for the Japanese Hitachi company. You could almost play full court basketball on that table. Dribbling with the T-slots would be challenging
Cincinnati Milacron robotic arms for welding and manufacturing cars in the 80’s. When they started to step away from their mills and grinders. I like the contrast of the old with the new, and showing how they are completely related
Cincinnati Mill’s first computer controlled robot, known internally as Cobra. It completed in 1972. First prototypes were released in 1974, rather than sold, so everyone could learn.
1899 Gisholt turret lathe. I like the little crane arm to lift work or even chucks
This Logan lathe was sent in by @_bklein “My uncle had this in his engine block shed, always said he’d get it going. I cleaned it up, now just gotta find space to use it. 1942” Looks good. Nice classic! Thanks for sharing 
Love seeing people keeping old machinery going. Thankfully they were built to last
This CNC crash comes from @themaniacalmachinist off a ROMI M17 lathe. “Cnc crashes. I’ve been rescuing parts and toolholders for this guy for the past month. Second time I’ve patched these parts and 2 identical toolholders destroyed and its only tuesday.” What a pain. Wish him luck for the rest of the week. Thanks for sharing
This Cincinnati Milacron CNC comes from @steelersfever75 “Our arrow 500 , its been here as long as i have , 21 years still a great machine.” Thanks for sharing! I’m going to be showing more information on Cincinnati Mills including CNC in the future. So stay tuned
Cincinnati Mills expanded to centertype grinders in the 1920s
New CNC Grinder by Heald, a division of Cincinnati Mills, announced at 1984 IMTS. Was anyone there? Featured a programmable gantry arm for work handling and wheel changing. Quite the upgrade from my previous post.  . Link is in my profile
Simmons Machine Tool Corporation of Albany, New York, have long been established as makers of large, specialised machine tools – especially those for the railway industry. Established in 1910 as rebuilders of large lathes, today they make state-of-the-art CNC machines to do the very traditional jobs of railway. I like how the tailstock handle faces toward the headstock
Thanks @pnfkustoms
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“Big thanks to @grungymachinist for the kick-ass shirt.  The machine is a lil cruddy from being mothballed while looking for non existent parts that I’ll just machine with another machine.  1947 Cincinnati 0-8 vertical mill.  Follow @grungymachinist for awesome pictures and history about the .  There is a wealth of knowledge to be had and a bunch of awesome gear such as the T-shirt hanging on the front of the mill
Edwin Harrington & Sons Lathe. 
Facing a large casting in the smallest lathe (the 28″/48″) with its centres raised by 9″. Note the long extension arm carrying the tool post and the rather narrow flat belt drive- the cut could only have been a light one, despite the bracing arm which can be seen reaching down to a slideway machined along the lower edge of the bed at floor level
This photo was sent in by @nemojoe890 from his visit to London Science Museum. It’s a Richard Roberts lathe from 1816
A cutter Grinder built by the newly named Cincinnati Milling Co. in 1889. It was one of their first machines manufactured. It was partially built to get their name in established milling shops to sharpen their used bits.
The original Cincinnati Milling Machine Co. factory on Spring Grove Ave. However, this illustration is from 1905 after 5 expansions showing off the popularity of their products. 
 the  for Cincinnati Milling Co shirts and more. Stay tuned for for new updates and features on the site soon
Dean Smith and Grace Lathe sent in from @pkemp227 shop. Looks nice. I would love to have a nice large lathe like that in my shop again. Not that I need it, but I probably don’t “need” half the machines in my shop. ☺️   for Dean Smith and Grace shirts and others
Got a new book today! Looking forward to sharing some of the pictures and information in here
This picture was sent in by @ufukrusen. This is his son working on Stanco vtl 1967. Congratulations for passing on your skills and knowledge
The duplicator in that pic has been converted to CNC only. The bare metal area to the right of the spindles is where the tracer head was attached. Where the rotary unit sits, is where you would put your model (usually wood or renboard). By using the stylus to trace your model, you’d “duplicate” it’s shape into your workpieces on the left.The Y axis ways are directly behind the tube workpiece in that pic. The amount of weight the Y axis screw has to move is incredible! Dozens of tons (everything you see above the workpiece
The plutonium cores for nuclear weapons are roughly cast to shape, then finish machined on a lathe, behind protection of course. Reportedly, the Monarch 10EE was the machine of choice
Newton Machine Company was based in Philadelphia, PA. I was trying to find more information on that Newton milling machine I posted yesterday. Instead I found this1903 Duplex Vertical Spindle Milling Machine that was pretty neat
This classic 6ft Carlton was sent in by @almeidadedos from his shop. I used to run one similar to this. Thanks for sharing
1897 Gisholt Heavy Turret Lathe. I find it interesting how the turret is clearly angled towards the backside of the bed
Newton Machine Works milling machine at Altoona, Pennsylvania railroad machine shop
Declassified picture from Department of Energy working on a nuclear power plant. You could easily bore a two story house with that.
Happy Father’s Day. This picture comes from @shamshirpourian_mohammad “He was working for the oil company at that time in Abadan oil refinery in Iran.” Thanks for sharing! Feel free to send in your pics
Japanese Toyo/Record/Manix ML360 in basic form – but fitted with the optional powered vertical milling and drilling head.
The Murad Bormilathe was first produced in the late 1950s and manufactured until the late 1960s. It was certainly an unusual machine; the headstock and No. 3 Morse taper tailstock each being mounted on independent vertical slides and capable of adjustment to give a centre height of between 3.5 and 7 inches
Gisholt turret lathe 1893
Happy Father’s Day! This is @alireza_saghir father with a South Bend lathe. Thanks for sharing! Feel free to send in your pics
Happy Father’s day! This is @agustindima “grandfather machining stuff, it was about 50 years ago.My grandpa was born in Italy in mid 30’s, then traveled to Argentina because the WWII when he was a child, he worked in different factorys until his retirement in mid 80’s then opened a grocery store in the house built in Buenos Aires.” Thanks for sharing! 
Feel free to send in your pics
Happy Father’s Day. This picture comes from @bradjmrozinski “My father in law in the shop I now run. Late 70’s. First year of business, and first boring mill.” Thanks for sharing! Feel free to send in your pics
Happy Father’s Day. This picture is from @rada820 “Dad running our Graziano Sag12” Thanks for sharing! Feel free to send in your pics
Happy Father’s Day! This picture comes from @danialkianynejad “While he was repairing our decked fp4m milling machine” Thanks for sharing! Feel free to send in your pics
Happy Father’s Day. This picture comes from @receprusen “my father 1988 big master”  Thanks for sharing! Feel free to send in your pics
Mr T G Phillips operates a lathe at a factory somewhere in Britain 1944. He is producing artificial limbs and uses his own artificial arm to work the lathe.
That’s perseverance
Send in your pics of your father’s or grandfather’s maching to be shared on Father’s Day tomorrow This photo is of @fmcvetkovic father. Thanks for sharing
This photo was sent in from @akecarlssonphoto. I believe it is the SKF bearing factory. Thanks for sharing
All posters of images like this one are now on sale at . Get a 24×36 for $25.   This 1923 poster is of a gentleman with a 15-inch Hartness Flat Turret Lathe showing a simple arrangement of tools for producing parts of cone friction clutches, broad tools being used for short taper surfaces
Good old Archdale multi spindle drill. 1940s
Gleason 25 inch spiral bevel gear generator or cutter
Becker Brainyard gear cutter
The Mars Manufacturing and Toolmaking Co. Pty Ltd started life as Rapson and Dutton in 1920 and was located in Bridge Street, Fortitude Valley, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. They changed their name around 1942. I thought it was kind an of interesting marketing approach at the time
Big Betts vertical boring machine
Brainard’s No. 3 Standard Universal Milling Machine
Atlas metal lathe bed, being machined on Kearney Trecker milling machine
Ferrari M1R and M2R Universal precision Milling Machine. Manufactured by C.B.Ferrari s.a.s. di R.Bianchi & Co. at via Mazzini, 58, Mornago (Varese) in Italy during the 1960s and 1970s
Sebastian 13″ Gold Seal Geared-head, Quick-change lathe of the late 1920s

. Have a good weekend
Photo by @dinosaur_curb_blood”This is the very last #5 warner&swasey ever shipped so its actually the newest one in existence and our shop now owns it” Thanks for sharing
Miyano BND-51C. I have a sub routine that I run all the time to put ID reliefs inside parts. I temporarily removed that boring bar and put in a live tool holder for slotting key way for a special job. Forgot to swap the tools back and ran the sub routine. Came down and rapid right on top of a set of aluminum jaws at 3000rpm. Shattered the window too. OG name is @buffalo666
Canadian-built XLO Ram Turret Milling Machine
Le Blond Lathe, 18″x 60″
Kearney & Trecker finalising bay where machines were ‘finished ‘ after painting at Eaton Road, Hove, England c 1965. 
Would have loved to have been able to walk through there
Kearney & Trecker finalising bay where machines were ‘finished ‘ after painting at Eaton Road, Hove, England c 1965. Would have loved to have been able to walk through there
This CNC crash comes Robert on Facebook. “Mazak qt15 The guy left a boring bar in and smashed it at 100% into the panel behind the chuck” That had to make a pretty good noise. Thanks for sharing
Guy demonstrating holding work in a collet chuck on Warner Swasey turret lathe. 
Poster of this image is available at . Click on the
This 1923 poster is of a gentleman with a 15-inch Hartness Flat Turret Lathe showing a simple arrangement of tools for producing parts of cone friction clutches, broad tools being used for short taper surfaces. Let me know what you guys think of this poster. Poster is now available
1917 Starrett Bench Micrometer ad. This poster is now available at .   Let me know what you guys think
This CNC crash comes in from @adamculumovic. “This was a nice 3/4 Kennametal roughing cutter until night shift happened” Maybe just use some loctite, and give it back to the night shift. ☺️ Thanks for sharing
Man demonstrates boring cutters on a Warner Swasey turret lathe. 
Poster of this image is available at .   Does anyone recognize the turret model?
Cincinatti Horizontal Milling Machine, #4, Serial-103, 18-1300 RPM, 40″ travel table, 20″ cross travel.
Cincinnati Bickford radial drill. I guess not only do you have to be a machinist to operate this, but also an acrobat. ☺️
Also where are the guys feet, second from the bottom?
Good morning to my USA followers. ☕ Hope everyone has a good Monday and start for the week! 
This is My Cycle Start mug available .
Real screw cutting job at Niles Tool Works. Screw is 6″ diameter 62 feet long. Quadruple threads 1-1/8″ pitch, 4 1/2″ lead, and weighs 5,000 pounds. That’s of a heck screw job.
Cincinnati Hypro VTL
Here’s another one to figure out. Does anyone know what make or model this lathe is? 
The tag says The EA Kinsey Co Machinery Cincinnati Indianapolis
1892 G. A. Gray Co., Spiral-Geared Metal Planer
Giddings and Lewis radial drill. It is kind of big. Has a 34″ column 10′ arm. Shown drilling a 5″ twist drill. 50 HP. I’m happy that many of you have enjoyed this post. I have a lot of respect for these machines. 
 we have a lot of unique shirts and products that I know machinist would like. ⤴️
GRAY Double Housing Planer 2-rail & 1-side head, 144″ x 42′ T-slotted work Table, 150″ x 72″ x 504″ capacity.
Old big radial drill drilling into a boiler 1950s
This CNC crash comes from @dukeharleyoriginals. “Co workers Blake co axel indicator after he unintentionally hit his Z-.” Something like that would make me want to call it a day.
Nice portable crane from @destination____unknown. Would make a nice engine lift he’s got this crane for sale so message him if you are interested.
Hendey 4C lathes being used in a factory
Porter-Cable Rapid Production Lathe  circa 1914/19 with drive from a factory line-shaft
built by the Fitchburg Machine Works and is known as the Lo-swing) is designed especially for turning shafts, pins and forgings not exceeding 31/2 inches in diameter. It has two carriages [116] A and B which, in conjunction with special tool-holders, make it possible to turn several different diameters simultaneously
Universal Milling Machine Avia C20 with milling head FNCK and Fagor position display X 420mm Y 210mm Z 340mm spindle taper ISO40 Spindle speeds 56-1800 U / min feed 11,2-355mm / min Quill 80mm Table size ca.700x300mm
112 inch Noble and Lund lathe 1949
Dean Smith & Grace Lathes shirt available in many different colors at . We also have hoodies and other brands available
Hendey lathe factory 1921
Manufactured, or factored by, ”The General Radial Drill Co.” of Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. the interesting Schaffner ”9-inch” bench lathe 
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Advertising Archdale combination machine. Lathe, drill shaper, planer all in one. 
Happy Friday!
TOS Introduced in 1957 – and made until the mid 1960s in what used to be Czechoslovakia by the communist, state-controlled TOS/Skoda machine-tool group – the 190 mm (7.5″) centre height by x 750, 1000 or 1250 mm (30″, 40″ or 50″) between-centres “Zbrojovka” SV-18R lathe was sold in the UK (initially through Elgar machine tools of Feltham, Middlesex) using three different brands: Zbrojovka, TOS and MAS
This is the complete parts diagram for a heavy South Bend lathe with double tumbler gearbox. All the diagrams are high resolution, and are laid out in a logical sense. I’m working on the 9″ model A now. Please let me know what you think, and if you would like to a poster like this for your machine. We even have the ability to ship them framed. It would make a really nice gift.
Japanese 	Takisawa TAL460 – North American market model with the carriage handwheel on the left of the apron and fitted with a chip guard. Looks like a sweet lathe
Archdale Heavy Shaping Machine from 1885. I think “Heavy” may be an understatement.
Archdale Electric Metal Lathe from 1899. We’ve come ways since then haven’t we?
Don’t forget your safety glasses today!
At one time a leading importer and distributor of machine tools in Germany, in 1898 Schuchard & Schütte had the biggest store in the country, an impressive building in the centre of Berlin, with additional outlets in Brüssel and Wien. Wanting to sell only first-class products, most of the larger machines were imported from America.
If someone could send me a nice picture of the logo on one of these machines, I would really appreciate it! ☺️ Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
14″ Seneca Falls lathe with screwcutting gearbox.
Swiss made Christen Type U-O Universal Precision Milling machine.
Hendey lathe shirt and more machinist gear .
Later model Sheldon 10″ lathe Series L and XL with twin-tumbler screwcutting gearbox as manufactured from the late 1940s until the 1960s and fitted with a screwcutting and feeds gearbox and power cross-feed as standard, 
This particular machine is a model EXL56B
Can anyone email me a really nice flat closeup of the Sheldon nameplate shown in red here? They are on various parts of these Sheldon lathes. I would greatly appreciate it.
Archdale Jig drilling components.  George. I keep telling you, going to work in your grandfather’s pin-stripe trousers won’t get you promotion
Sheldon 10-inch lathe with single-tumbler screwcutting gearbox as manufactured during the 1940s.
All South Bend lathe owners! Finally finished one of the first poster ideas. It took quite a bit of time, but I think it came out pretty neat. I would appreciate any feedback at all. This is the complete parts diagram for a heavy South Bend lathe. All the diagrams are high resolution, and are laid out in a logical sense. I’m working on the 9″ model A now. Please let me know what you think, and if you would like to a poster like this for your machine. We even have the ability to ship them framed. It would make a really nice gift.
Nice picture of a heavy South Bend lathe from @fierce_metal_fabrication This is a nice setup with the turret. Thanks for sharing
One of the options offered by South Bend during the 1920s and 1930s was their “High Swing” range. These lathes used standard beds, headstocks, carriage and tailstock units, but with the centre height raised by a set of cast-iron blocks
Photo by @fierce_metal_fabrication of his nice Hendey Metal Lathe. Love these machines. Thanks for sharing.
Here’s a Shear for you
Boring wheels in Pittsburgh, PA 1950s.Just another boring day
Big horizontal boring machine. In Pittsburgh, PA. That must be fun to set up
Metal Lathe from Mesta Machine Company I Pittsburgh, PA. Keep your hands and ties out of the spinning parts
Here’s a nice classic Clausing Colchester from @customcnc622 “This is a 1967 Clausing 13×36 lathe. It has seen better days but still runs like a Cadillac.” I bet it runs better than the Asian Cadillac model lathes. Joking, I know what you mean, but there is a series of lathes called Cadillacs
Here’s another picture from the @themaniacalmachinist. It’s a “108” Broadbent” Metal Lathe. Apparently all his machines are green
72″ Metal Lathe turning a crankshaft for a ship on Quincy, MA in 1901
60″ Lansing facing lathe from @themaniacalmachinist
John Lang and Sons metal lathe at Leys Malleable Castings Company in 1920s and 30s Derby. I love the long chip and these old pictures of lathework being done with a tie
Any Wade owners out there? Wade No. 94 stand showing the substantial variable-speed drive unit in the left-hand compartment, coolant pump in the centre on a hinge-out door and a collet storage rack (made of aluminium) mounted on the inside face of the right-hand door.The stand was constructed from heavy-gauge sheet metal, reinforced and welded for rigidity and built into the top was a removable chip drawer – on ball-bearing runners
Wade 8A metal lathe on Self-contained Underdrive Oak Cabinet Stand

Wade Tool Co. shirts are now available
A female factory worker in 1942, Fort Worth, Texas. My hats off to all female machinist, and putting up with grungy men like us.   And to any that can handle a turret like that
Happy Mother’s Day
South Bend Lathe Works factory. Six headstock casting at a time being gang milled on their bases.
South Bend Lathe Works factory. 
A row of 25 lathes (at the time the standard build batch) under assembly. These are 9-inch “Workshop” machines each with a build sheet hanging from the tailstock end of its bed. Although the room would have been cleaned and tidied for the photograph it is still possible to spot backgear covers on the floor and, on the nearest lathe, a spring-bottom oil can.
This CNC crash comes from @alexwilliams_27 “10mm slot drill snapped, hit the small window bounced off and smashed the big window. £4500 in glass” That’s a bummer, but I guess I would rather have good glass to prevent it from coming out the machine. Thanks for sharing!
Adcock and Shipley manufactured and factored a vast range of engineering equipment including, from the early to late 1950s, two sizes of a remarkable “Universal Machine Tool”. I wonder how much that machine weighs. I would love to see one of these in person.
Another Abene milling machine in vertical setup. I always thought this would be an interesting machine to operate.
This image comes from @vanlager.tirol. Here he is with his FP2 Deckel
Here’s some gears and calipers for ya! Gears for mining industry at Vickers Ruwolt, Burnley, Melbourne1967
Any Weiler fans out there? Vote on the Weiler shirt design posted yesterday to help decide on which one gets made.  for more  Weiler Matador Type W with a mechanically operated, infinitely Variable-Speed Drive
Pour one out for these poor taps. This image comes from @hatsfabrication. “Not a cnc crash. I broke these 1″-8 taps, 3 in one morning, In the same hole. Was tapping by hand too. Hole was hardened by previous guys who worked on it. I had to heat it and tap it while it was warm.” I can imagine that wasn’t fun. I would have said a few words, especially after the third one. Thanks for sharing
Any Abene fans out there? Abene VHF-2B shown set for horizontal milling. Abene millers were of very high quality and made by AB E.N. Eklunds, Mekaniska Verkstad, Stockholm 15, Sweden. The range of machines produced by the company appears to have been limited to just two models: the VHF-2B, introduced in 1942, and the VHF-3 of 1956
Photo by @steelersfever75 “Sharpening a gear shaper cutter on an old Cincinnati grinder”  Thanks for sharing
This image comes from @scottybhamx. It’s a Viper CNC machine. This is the machine that broke that large tap and toolholder that I shared on Monday. So go back if you haven’t seen it
This image comes from @vanlager.tirol. These Deckels are in a school in Austria. “In the back there are the legendary Austrian VÖST Lathes, the patent was sold to weiler…” Thanks for sharing
Boley UFR Precision Universal Mill and Jig driller from the 1930sThis special miller was fitted with built-in rotary table in the form of a compound slide with travels of  200 mm along the X axis of the table and 140 and 120 mm on the slide itself. Designed to help with radius milling the technique was to adjust the centre of the radius, by using a zero stop under the spindle, then set the X axis to the radius size. The z-axis (on the head) was also adjustable, in 25 mm steps, by loosing the milling-head beam and inserting measuring slip blocks under two rests, one on each column arm. The milling head had travel of 50 mm
Personal photo of mine. Prototyping, designing, and operating CNC machines is fun. Sometimes it’s nice and peaceful to just sit in the shop at an old quiet drill press, and make a bunch of holes in plastic cubes
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Here’s a Carlton Radial Drill from @jehleiter09. “Carlton radial arm drill working on a large gear blank” Thanks for sharing.
15″ LeBlond Metal Lathe from @bertalmighty. Thanks for sharing this classic lathe.
Hope your Monday is going better than this. 
This CNC crash comes from @scottybhamx. “1.5 over sized tap. Blew up everything” Thanks for sharing.
A beautiful Deckel FP1 from @lodicustom. I’m jealous. Deckel shirts are now available .
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
This would be impressive to see in person. This comes from @a_efimkin “Deckel FP-1, year of production – 1918. In DMG MORI Used Machines showroom in Germany.” Thanks for sharing
This old Index Vertical Mill comes in from @guido_yes “Here’s my 1944 index” Looks like it is in great shape.
Photo by @toby_lightning of Geometry adjustment on a 1987 Deckel DC35 done last Year. Looks good.
This CNC crash comes from @b42575p. “2” diameter…” Ouch.
TOS FN40 Universal Precision Milling Machine. Made in  Czechoslovakian Republic with a vertical, T-slotted knee some 1160 x 260 mm and fitted with five 12/21 mm T-slots on 45 mm spacing, the front of the machine was intended to accept a choice of two rectangular tables – one plain and the other able to be inclined, tilted and swung and fitted with an in-out feed. Two motors were fitted: one, of 2.2 kW, was used to drive the cutter spindle; the other, of 1.8 kW, the table-feeds’ gearbox – both drives passing from motor to gearbox using double V-belts. Running in high-precision roller bearings.
TOS FN Universal Precision Milling Machine Factory Assembled machines being checked before cosmetic finishing.
Toledo Lathe. Originally cataloged as the No. 6 lathe, this massive 3400 lb machine was subsequently referred to as the Model 326 and supplied as standard with an 80-inch long bed and a swing of 30 inches. Driven by a 4-inch wide flat belt from a 200 r.p.m. countershaft, the lathe would have had adequate reserves of power to spin thicker-than-normal work – as well as being suitable for heavy-duty burnishing and bead turning on larger diameters
This image comes in from @bailey_vos of a Giddings and Lewis horizontal he works on
Here’s another image from @bailey_vos of “98” industrial wood chipper we have been working on the last couple months.” Looks like you’ve guys have put in some hours on that piece
The “baby” of the Toledo lathes the 16-inch swing spinning lathe weighed a modest 600 lbs and was designed, according to the makers for: spinning, trimming, flanging, curling and wiring edges; for burnishing pressed, stamped or drawn work in brass, copper, tin, aluminium, steel or black iron. 
Check the
Dean Smith & Grace LathesType 13 SB 13-inch swing Surfacing and Boring Lathe with plain or roller bearing spindle
A special temperature-controlled section of the toolroom held a Pratt & Whitney jig borer for Dean Smith & Grace Lathes
Manufactured by Gebrüder Saacke, at Eutingen, to the east of Pforzheim in Germany during the early 1950s, the “Saacke” was unusual for a miniature precision lathe in being arranged as a “combination machine”. In this respect it was rather like the (far less versatile) British Coronet “Ruby” lathe of a few years earlier in being adaptable, by being set vertically, to be used as a precision milling and drilling machine
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
These Barber & Colman Hobbing machines come from @huntermccrary
13″ x 30″ Dean Smith & Grace With its patented “Fastlock” nose the headstock spindle of the 13-inch was bored to clear bar up to 1.5″ in diameter and ran on either precision Timken taper roller or plain bearings – in the latter case the front bearing was 3.5 inches in diameter and 4 inches long –  with a mid-point bearing to add stiffness. A 5 h.p. motor gave twelve speeds, through multi V-belts (a flat belt was optional), from either 16.8 to 750 rpm or 22.5 to 1000 rpm. The roller-bearing spindle model was available with a single speed range of  31 to 1400 rpm.
Archdale drilling machine. Now that’s a drill. I wonder how many horse power that is.
Smith-Drum 14″ x 36″ lathe was built in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Of the sliding-bed type it was able to perform both as an ordinary engine lathe as well as take exceptionally long or large-diameter components. With the bed slid back so that a gap was opened, a huge faceplate could be mounted and the machine used for facing.
If you thought you were having a bad day. This destroyed roughing mill comes from @nymanolof “40 mm HSS roughingtool and the operator says “it runs better without coolant”. needless to say she is not allowed to borrow my tools at all” 
Thanks for sharing
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
This nice size lathe comes from @johnandmarti “1953 Monarch 60” swing”Thanks for sharing
Photo by @sk_machine with a pretty good size saw blade on the arbor
This CNC machine comes from @toby_lightning “German CNC-Machine from 1989
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
This one comes in from @kallinenjp “1930s-1940s Fellows shaper in our shop, we use it to cut internal splines” Thanks for sharing.
Feinprüf Tricurat 60 Surface Grinder Heavily built with a cast-as-one base and column, the machine featured well-proportioned wearing surfaces that were either hardened steel or heat-treated cast iron given a very fine machined finish or lap ground. Guideways were all protected by close-fitting bellows and the 23″ x 7″ table ran on vertically and horizontally mounted precision ball bearings whose tracks were hardened and lapped.
This CNC crash comes from @215illmatic “Hey man, love the page! Post this one up if ya can, I call it ‘Monday
These Barber & Colman Hobbing machines come from @huntermccrary
This is another 1913 gun lathe from Armstrong Whitworth’s Openshaw works.100″ swing, 80 ft between centres. 60 HP main motor.The ‘tool post’ nearest the tailstock is for supporting a 12″ diameter boring bar.For quick movement of the tailstock barrel the large handwheel/flywheel is used. For ‘forcing the centre into the work’ the small handwheel is engaged. The enlarged diameter at the front of the tailstock casting is actually a shrunk-on steel ring, to reduce the possibility of the tailstock casting bursting under the load
German  Maho MH700 with external, covered motor. Note the slideways protected by bellows
Archdale  34″ Vertical Miller with Sliding Head. Installed in the Rotaprint works in London, this machine is being used to mill the cast-iron side frames of the Company’s litho printing machine. All bosses and bearing positions were machined on the 34″ – with just less than two hours allowed for the job. I like the little wooden platform he stands on.
Smallest in the range – the 12-inch Rockford “Economy” lathe with twin-lever gearbox and flick-in-and-out control of feeds on the apron
Built by the Spanish Company Banolas. the Metba Precision Universal Milling Machine was manufactured in a range of five sizes, the MB-0, MB1, MB-2, MB-3 and MB-4. All were constructed along identical lines and employed the traditional design features as used by makers of similar models such as Deckel, Maho and Thiel
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Gooley-Edlund “Briggs”Milling Machine. Produced in early 1900s for production use. That’s why there is no real crossfeed. You would replace the arbor for each job. There are adjustments
Mattsson & Zetterlund (Junger) “M & Z” Type VF-600 milling machine was a very high-quality product (all geometrical tolerances where held to better than 5 microns) with considerable attention to detail and with a suberb cosmetic finish. Heavily built (it weighed 1100 lbs/515 kg) and enjoying a comprehensive specification, in layout it resembled a jig borer of the Linley, Downham, Vernon and SIP 1-H type the table sat on the base and did not elevate) -but with the great advantage that it was usefully larger and fitted with a head that could, by using a handwheel working through worm-and-wheel gearing, be tilted 45° each side of vertical
This next set of post are going to be different views of the same lathe. Armstrong-Whitworth’s Openshaw works in 1913, and see another lathe manufactured there. This one was made specifically for turning and boring gun barrels.The bed was over 96 feet long, and the boring bar was nearly 81 ft long. 100 HP motor. There are two leadscrews and two layshafts, each 100 FEET LONG, each forged in one piece
Armstrong-Whitworth’s Openshaw works in 1913, and see another lathe manufactured there. This one was made specifically for turning and boring gun barrels.The bed was over 96 feet long, and the boring bar was nearly 81 ft long. 100 HP motor. There are two leadscrews and two layshafts, each 100 FEET LONG, each forged in one piece
Armstrong-Whitworth’s Openshaw works in 1913, and see another lathe manufactured there. This one was made specifically for turning and boring gun barrels.The bed was over 96 feet long, and the boring bar was nearly 81 ft long. 100 HP motor. There are two leadscrews and two layshafts, each 100 FEET LONG, each forged in one piece
Look at the guy on the right for a size comparison. Armstrong-Whitworth’s Openshaw works in 1913, and see another lathe manufactured there. This one was made specifically for turning and boring gun barrels.The bed was over 96 feet long, and the boring bar was nearly 81 ft long. 100 HP motor. There are two leadscrews and two layshafts, each 100 FEET LONG, each forged in one piece
Hendey Machine Company shirts are now available at 

Click the
Tailstock of an Armstrong-Whitworth lathe in Manchester in 1905, supplied to Wallsend Slipway & Engineering on the River Tyne
Dangerous work: 400 women died in munitions factories, between 1914 (when this image was taken) and 1918, when the war ended. Props to all women machinist and CNC operators
Pratt & Whitney 13″ lathe, available with capacities of 32″ and 50″ between centers
Pratt & Whitney Precision MillersA lot of people are familiar with their lathes, but they made a few different milling machine models. The milling machine’s table was identical in section to that used on the company’s Precision Bench Lathe – so allowing accessories to be economically transferred between the two machines.
Personal photo of an Okuma I used to operate in a vacuum factory.
Radial Drill from @johnbendingbars83.Thanks for the pic
Brown & Sharpe No. 0 Omniversal as advertised during the early 1960sI would love to have one of these machines
German 1950 Maho SK250 precision universal milling machine
This CNC crash comes from @jordan_stuper. “Operator forgot to change the inserts ”

Check your inserts folks
Built by the Spanish Company Banolas. the Metba Precision Universal Milling Machine was manufactured in a range of five sizes, the MB-0, MB1, MB-2, MB-3 and MB-4. All were constructed along identical lines and employed the traditional design features as used by makers of similar models such as Deckel, Maho and Thiel.
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
German Hermle Universal Precision Milling Machine was built both as a standard model, the UWF-700 and in two more complex versions: the UWF-700-PH with Manual and Positioning Controls and a CNC version, the UWF-700. Constructed with a particularly robust cast-iron main column dowelled and bolted to a heavy, internally ribbed baseplate that held a coolant tank, the miller was designed to be capable of both production and toolroom work. This versatility was enhanced by the twelve spindle speeds that spanned, to the customer’s choice, either 45 to 2000 r.p.m. or (at extra cost) 63 to 2800 r.p.m. Driven by a 2 or 2.2 kW motor
CNC crash from @international_house_of_taint “BT40 tool found in production Mori Seiki after lunch, no one saw it happen”

Ouch. Thanks for sharing the pic
Archdale 20″ Horizontal Milling Machine.  Employed in the Allis Chambers combined-harvester  factory, this machine is shown simultaneously facing the bolt bosses and splitting an engine connecting rod. Prior to this operation the rod had been faced on its other sides on an Archdale 20″ horizontal miller. Note the racks holding finished and part-finished parts.
1901 Threading lathe
Linley Jig Borer with the first type of power down-feed spindleManufactured by Linley Brothers of 682 State Street Extension, Bridgeport 1, Connecticut
This CNC crash video comes from @andrewthemachinist “That was a bit loud.”
Part came out of vise in a Mori DV5100
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
This CNC crash comes from @thoodicoff “Guy at worked had the Z set to Z-50 inches instead of 5, ripped 3 jaws off the chuck, loudest bang I’ve ever heard” ☺️ Thanks for the pic
Archdale factory. Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Here’s a Universal Brown & Sharpe horizontal mill from @johnbendingbars83. Here he’s using it for keying. I love these machines. Thanks for the pic
I think this endmill might be dull ☺️ This burnt up mill comes from @prigodan

Thanks for the CNC crash pic. Keep them coming
This one comes from @coldforge666 “This is the 48′ Berthiez. CNC, 150t, up to 48′ dia and something like 16 feet tall.” Thanks for sharing
Shipyard lathework. I would love to operate a lathe where I can stand on the carriage. I could stand on my current carriage now, but I don’t think I could get any work done
P-huré Paris milling machine from @alex_bouida. I’m not exactly sure what they are doing there
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Another personal photo of a Doosan that I used to operate. It was a pain, because the spindle would come down 0.004 as the bearing expanded over use during the day. Always having to change offsets in the morning after every cycle
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Yesterday I showed a much older Schaublin mill. This model SV11-A was introduced in the early 1940s, during WW2. Table travels on the SV11-A were 150 mm longitudinally, 80 mm in traverse and 150 mm vertically. Drive came from a single or 2-speed motor of around 0.5 h.p. mounted partially within the column
Real Schaublin SV11-A is fitted with the maker’s vertical head showing other side
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Personal photo of the Mori I used to operate. This is a NV5000
Nice big LeBlond lathe from @johnbendingbars83. “It has a 48″ Chuck. I can swing 3ft with the gap closed. 6 ft with the gap opened up. 12 ft longMy 90 year old grandfather will still come out and use it from time to time.” That’s a beast of a lathe to work. Thanks for sharing
You hear a lot about there prescision watchmakers lathes, but you don’t hear as much about their mills. This is a circa 1933 Schaublin SV12 using a mixture of round and V belts in its drive system. Looks pretty sweet. They had lots of attachments for these like they did their lathes
Here’s a Universal Brown & Sharpe horizontal mill from @johnbendingbars83. Here he’s using it for facing. I love these machines. Thanks for the pic
I’ve got a lot of the Archdale factory pics. Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers
Cincinnati Milling Machine Company factory
Manufactured by Globe Products Mfg. Co. of 3380 Robertson Blvd., Ashley, Los Angeles, California, the Globe lathe milling attachment had a principle of operation like that of a “Lincoln” miller where the workpiece, instead of moving, was clamped to a table and the cutter head made to traverse across it. A Globe head, cross slide and arbor support mounted on a 10-inch Logan lathe. Please
Archdale 18″ Combined Sliding and Swivelling Head High Speed Vertical Milling Machine – shown in use at the Barnsley works of Beatson, Clark & Co. Ltd. makers of glass bottles. The miller is shown running at 2000 r.p.m. using a 3/32″ spherical cutter to mill 60 angular flutes in a glass bottle mound
This mill pic comes from @retro_rioux 
Montréal., Québec, Canada. Stanko milling stainless

Thanks the pic. Send me your pics, if you want me to share
Concrete Metal Lathe. Search for it, and you will find instructions on how to cast your own metal lathe out of concrete. It’s kind of interesting.
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Man, I love this crash photo. This one comes in from @bmauk. “Someone’s looking for a new job”  
Please  the CNC gear I have in the
Archdale 20″ Horizontal Milling Machine. Judging by the footwear, this operator must have been brought down from Accounts to strike a suitable pose
WWI woman working on a turret lathe in a munitions plant. Props to them
This is a Rose Engine lathe. If you don’t know what ornamental turning is, you don’t know a lot about machinist work. These date back to the 1500s.Ornamental turning is many-faceted branch of turning which uses specialized lathes and cutting tools.  There are a number of highly specialized forms of lathe work commonly grouped together under the name of ornamental turning, or OT for short.  Historically it has been known as “complex” or “eccentric” turning, only to distinguish it from “plain” turning which can be accomplished between centers @preview.app
View of production at Blackburn Olympia Aircraft during 1939-45 period.Those are some good old Kearney & Trecker mills there
Founded in 1868 by James Archdale, by 1917 the Company was making (or had made, like most of its competitors) a wide variety of machine tools, including drills, milling machine, shapers, planers ,borers, lathes, hand and power presses and the usual miscellany of general engineering equipment such as surface plates and cutters. They could also set up manufacturing plants, make one-off machine tools and undertake commissions to develop patents and improvements for other makers.
Rolls-Royce aero engine factory which was originally built to produce engines for Spitfires and Hurricanes during the Second World War.Here are multi-spindle automatic machines manufacturing nuts, adaptors and unions from bar material
One of my favorite CNC crash pics from @beck_275. “When you wreck brand new Brother, our shop rewards with a trophy of your broken parts
How NOT to mill a part to size  
From @cb7synth 
Said Not me! Hahaha a co-worker and I thought it was hilarious so I took a pic. He left the damn machine running on the wrong height offset for a good 30 seconds. Killed a tool holder and of course the tool in it.

Nice. Keep sending me your maching breaks and crashes. These are fun
1940s, Bristol-manufactured Cowards vertical milling attachment fitting any ordinary round-overarm horizontal miller. 
Not revolutionary, but you have to love that name! ☺️ Who would come up with that?
Another from @jameesssss “Running a devlieg tonight which has been retrofitted with a Heidenhan nc probably my favourite one in this shop
This one comes in from @jsitasz. “G54P10 not G54P1 damnit!!!” Keep sending in these crashes. 
 for some fun CNC products
Here’s a picture of a close call from @brandonpress on his Haas VF2 SS 
If people have pictures of crashes, I would love to share them
70 years old school Belgian horizontal borer that @jameesssss runs in his shop. Pretty cool
To give you fellow machinist some insight into the @grungymachinist. I was teaching a weekly class on robotics with some younger people tonight at the local library.  They range in age from 10 to 14. They are programming Arduinos
Shop pic from @20advr. Looks nice! Thanks for the pic. Keep them coming
Nice Carlton Radial Drill from @bp_metalworx
Kurt Tombstone for Horizontal CNC Mill. Send me pictures of your tombstones and I’ll share
Nice Kurt Tombstone from @carvesmart. Thanks for the pic
Green Oerlikon Dap from 1973 from @vanlager.tirol

Looks sweet
Nice size 1977 German VDF Metal Lathe from @receprusen
This Hendey lathe attachment was for enabling toolmakers to secure carriage spacing accurately to 0.0001″. The main casting is bolted to the front right wing of carriage. The nut is fitted to bracket casting which is clamped to front Vee of lathe bed. The disc hand wheel is keyed to a gear shaft, and has a roller handle. The dials for 12″-20″ lathes are 6″ dia and for 24″ they are 7″ dia. All are graduated in tenths of thousandths of an inch

Check the .
Hendey factory planning 8 14 x 6 beds, 4 to a row. Planer has 4 tool heads, two on the cross rail, one on each of the uprights
18 x 10 Tiebar Hendey Metal Lathe that @rfarmer1989 uses. Looks nice
You know those times you wanted to CNC custom designs on the top of SUVs?
PowerTec Vertical Machining Center
Here’s a sweet Hendey setup, that I bet few have seen. This one is from a Hendey catalog I have.

12″ Geared Head fitted with direct connected motor drive. Friction clutch control on power shift of lathe head designed for starting and stopping spindle with motor running. Draw in sleeve with hand wheel attached and set of watch tool chucks kept in small box mounted on post end of oil pan when not in use. Transposing gears for cutting metric and special threads assembled in iron cabinet attached to rear leg. Lathe and drill chucks also step chucks mounted on revolving pyramid on floor
Another from @quattrone91. Here’s a metal shaper that he says gets used often. Keep these old machines running. If people are interested I can share some Hendey shaper catalog pics
Giddings & Lewis boring mill from @ripandtear420&lewis
Big Carlton Radial Drill that @articwhite_ss operates
Metal Lathe from @retro_rioux. Thanks for the pic
Cincinnati Metal Shaper from @dinero.777
Old Vertical Cincinnati Milling Machine from @dinero.777 These are a beast
Fellows 36-6 Gear Shaper from @steelersfever75. Says he’s got 3 of them in his shop. Awesome.
Cincinnati Metal Shaper from @johnbendingbars83 Thanks for the pic. These machines are a workhorse still today
Manufactured in Italy during the 1960s and 1970s by a company now known as Simplex Rapid, the AR5-E proved to a very popular grinder across Europe, In the UK sales were handled by an engineering supply company, Astra, and badged as such. In Europe and other parts of the world other names were used including Elite and Elite-GEMA – though usually with the prefix (or suffix) AR5-E in the title as well. It was developed from earlier versions (ones known include the AR5-C on a cast-iron stand) and was part of a family of “Universal” grinders, the AFC-2 through to AFC-5
Check the
Big Metal Lathe 
Place of Origin:	China
Brand Name:	Jiesheng
Model Number:	C61160
Certification:	CE and ISO9001
Max.swing diameter:	1600mm
Tacci CNC lathe from @stevblev Looks pretty sweet.
Manufactured by Yun Fu Mechanical Industries Co. Ltd and marketed by the oddly named “Powerchannel Manufacturers Corporation” of Taipei, Taiwan, the “Round Tower” was an exact copy of the Bridgeport Series 1 Ram-head milling machine as produced during the 1960s
No Place like G28 G-Code Shirt. I just posted it online. Check my , and let me know know what you think
Grey/Futuremill planer from @mattpavelich  Happy Day  Happy
from @dillywilly1989  Happy and Day
1974 Brazilian Surface Cup Grinder from @lodicustom  Happy and Day
Got another from @dean_hossack in Queensland. This is a Macson 24-25 big. Thanks for the pic.  Happy
@bigjoestud messaged me this sweet pic of a Vertical Turret Lathe in their shop at Ajax Tool in Fort Wayne, Indiana
Deckel FP1 from @lodicustom. Awesome.  Happy Send me pics of your green machines, and I’ll post them today
TT-1230E from @ozarktoolmanuals  Happy   It’s day.
Peddinghaus Iron Worker. From @hatsfabrication  Happy Day. Send me your pics
Fisher Machine Co. Oil Grover from @victorymeadow   Happy Day  Keep sending pics
A typical Heinemann semi-automatic multi-tool lathe the D170 and D200. With centre heights of 170 and 200 mm respectively these lathes could take work up to 210/330 mm in diameter and up to 350/650 mm long.  Jobs were intended to be held in either a chuck or on an arbor and were frequently employed in large batches in motor and engine manufacturing plants.
Smell of Coolant in the Morning Short sleeve t-shirt available in a variety of sizes and colors. $23.50–$29.00

.
Blanchard No. 18 Surface Grinder
The Atlantic “geared-head” miller was manufactured by the Atlantic Machinery Corporation of 149 Broadway, New York. in, so far as can be ascertained, the 1930s and 1940s.
The 1 hp drive motor was held within the cast iron base – which also held the standard-fit coolant pump and tank – and drove up via twin V belts to a 6-speed gearbox, contained with the body of the miller, and holding gears which were all forged and hardened; whilst the standard machine was dispatched with a bottom speed of 150 rpm and a top of 675 rpm, alternative ranges were available to special order including 200 to 900 rpm and 3000 to 1350 rpm.
Alpin Model 160
Humpage, Thompson & Hardy catalogue illustration of the 2.75″ x 12″. This version is fitted with jockey pulley to tension the drive belt
From 1935 the Lewis Machine Tool Company of 3017 North Main Street, Los Angeles 31, California, U.S.A supplied sets of castings and associated parts from which it was possible (give reasonable workshop facilities and a degree of skill) to build a range of powered workshop equipment. Amongst the more ambitious projects offered were a 10-inch shaper, a small horizontal miller, a mechanical hacksaw and both bench and pillar drills.

 
 
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